From Puppy to Adulthood

Developement from puppy stage to adult show dog
Windwarrior’s Blue Argon is born on 28-5-2013.
It starts the time, when the breeder is watching him very carefully.

5 weeks

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8 weeks

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A few months later

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Young Adult

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Mature

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LV JMVA LT JMVA LVJV-14 BALTJV-14 Windwarrior’s Blue Argon

His career just started

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MOTTO

“When you look at a dog’s pedigree, it tells you what he OUGHT to be…
When you look at a dog in the ring, it tells you what he SEEMS to be…
When you look at a dog’s progeny it tells you what he IS.”

Pat Craig Trotter

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Once upon a time…

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When the honorable Lady Worldchampion “Pavesi Miss Aussie” noticed, that her first child pressed its way out, she gave birth on an Empire fauteuil, jumped clumsily down and laid down in the whelping box. There in short distance five more puppies were born.

She left the silent puppy on the chair without any view back. For her, he was obviously dead and his squeaking siblings needed her care. She was a pragmatical bitch.

In a short glimpse I realiazed how perfect he was; so harmonious, he was a great gift thanks to his breeder’s creativity.

I shook the newly born boy in order to get the eventually swallowed fluid out of his lungs. Carefully I took his little muzzle into my mouth, and sucked the last amniotic fluid out. Simultaneously I rubbed his floppy body without noticing at any moment, that he wanted to honour my efforts with at least the weakest sign of will to live.

Meanwhile I pressed him to my naked upper body, covered with a thick sweater of pure wool where the lifeless boy could at least feel my heart beat. Meanwhile I hurried from room to room, hoping my movement would induce him to own movement. But in vain. Minute after minute passed by, while my thoughts told me again and again:” give up, he is dead. You will not make it”., while I was desperately rubbing his little body.

There were still some last drops of “Respirot”, who should help to breath. I wondered, if they might be too old. I did not use it since years. I even did not remember how many drops can I give to a newborn puppy. Anyhow I dropped some Respirot on his muzzle. Repeating again and again my words, that a wonderful life was waiting to him, I gave him already his name “Heinmueck”, because as a child I thought that this fairy tail figure must be very strong.

More and more time passed by, while I whispered my promises and was rubbing him. Up and down I walked through these two rooms, I did not know how often I did it. Even, if he could neither hear or understand me, he should feel, that it was now time to live.

45 Minutes had passed since he was born, when suddenly out of the depth of his body came a dark tone and little cough. In my hand I felt a very weak, light tension in his body, nearly unnoticeable.

We managed it after all “Heinmueck” decided to live. While happy feelings overwhelmed me and I exhausted cried I felt a miracle had happened.
dodo

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That Is Our Life!

Breeder’s thoughts about his puppies’ way into life with his or her owner:

Of course, life should be pleasant. In no way the puppy should be bored and become a nuisance.
The fictive future owners must give him a task, according to his tremendous abilities and high intelligence. Nevertheless the owner’s sofa must be co-owned from puppyhood on.
Churchill’s ideas about “sport is murdering” are in no case valid for his future life. The partner of his life shall love long walks, sweat causing activities, be eager to spend endless week-ends on shows or training grounds.
Would it not be wonderful, if the puppy with all his instincts could choose his future owners? Certainly his instinct is wiser than all of our human thinking.
I am showing two very different ways of life.
In the end both – breeder and future owner are convinced: this dog is happy!

Gwen Shepperson’s Australian Cattle Dogs from KS-Ranch in Wyoming,USA are working companions of the Sheppersons.

“One of our herding Australian Cattle dogs is Sophie:
Sophie was actually given to me–a friend of a friend could not keep her due to a divorce, and I agreed to take her knowing only that she was 3 yrs old, red and was good with children. She turned out to be an Australian import with a nice pedigree and with an outstanding amount of natural ability–she had never seen a cow until I got her, and she worked as though she had been doing it all her life! She has a fabulous temperament and is now 9 years old, retired from hard work but I still take her to work on easy days so she still feels important. Otherwise, she is always at my side :)”.


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CeCe deserves more credit than I can give her

We were moving cows to calving pastures that got trucked home from the winter farm pastures today, the cows were cranky, it was dirty cold, snowing to beat hell and she never quit smiling and being positive. There have been a lot of times I have seriously wondered why I kept her, but today I think I finally realized why…she is teaching me to enjoy our job, even on the days when it’s not the most enjoyable. Thanks CeCe

CeCe herding

Show dog CH KS Ranch Cowboy Up or Sit In the Pickup, aka Waylon becomes a hard worker

“I have her brother “Waylon” here now as well.He was raised as a puppy, then went to a show home–he was happy, liked showing, but once he had his title and was no longer traveling to shows, he became very bored and needed much more in his life to keep him busy. B/c his owner travels very much for her job with AKC, I agreed to take him back. When he got here, he was so happy to have lots of freedom and exercise, but he was very different from my dogs, even his sister CeCe. You see, he went away to a home that did not require him to think through situations or use his instincts/mental skills very much. He was well socialized but had no idea how to interact with other dogs at liberty. His life had been about basic functions–eat, poop, pant, and stacking for show, that’s about it. It took him many months to learn how to think like a working dog, even though his natural instincts were very good. In fact, he is still learning!

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Wayntonatworh

AUS/US CH Turrella Blue Sky, our guest for love duties

Their sire AUS/US CH Turrella Blue Sky, was here for the summer when I bred him to Sophie. He had never seen a cow in his life and at age 7, he went right to work with my dogs as though he was doing it all his life, and he LOVED IT!This is Turrella Blue Sky working here at the ranch.

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Gwen’s conclusion about the nowadays ACD’s capability to work:
Here in the US I think the trend has been, that there are a lot of very small, lighter boned, weedy dogs, with narrow jaw/heads. Too big is not good either, they cannot travel very long, don’t have enough endurance to work.

Gwen:”Our dogs work very hard, in extreme heat or cold, many many miles–they get kicked, get sore feet, sometimes get teeth knocked out, sometimes worse injuries. Some people would think their life is torture or not as nice as the life of a city dog. Not every dog, even every ACD, is suited to the life we live, just like not every person is”!

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Video of Westminster Show 2014

Westminster Show 2014

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EURO Corgi Show 2013

https://welshcorgicardigan.wordpress.com/2013/12/03/results-euro-corgi-2013/

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FCI World Winner 2014

FCI World Dog Show 2014 in Helsinki

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Breeder/Zuechter

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Crufts 2014

Last Chance to Complete Online Entries For Crufts 2014

The Kennel Club would like to remind exhibitors of dogs qualified for Crufts 2014 that the deadline for online entries is midnight on Monday, 20thJanuary 2014.

The final entry date for Crufts has been extended to enable dogs which qualify at Boston and Manchester Dog Show Society Championship Shows in 2013 and 2014 to be entered.

Crufts takes place from 6th – 9th March 2014 at the NEC, Birmingham. The breed classes are scheduled to take place on the following days:

Thursday, 6th March 2014 — Working and Pastoral

Friday, 7th March 2014 — Terrier and Hound

Saturday, 8th March 2014 — Toy and Utility

Sunday, 9th March 2014 — Gundog

Gerald King, Chairman of Crufts said: “We thank all of the exhibitors who have so far entered Crufts 2014, the world’s most prestigious dog show, and would like to remind all exhibitors that the final closing date is 20th January 2014, so there is still time to enter. We moved the qualification date for Crufts back so that exhibitors who qualify at Manchester and Boston can bring their dogs to Crufts in 2014, rather than having to wait almost 14 months for the opportunity.”

Postal entries have now closed but exhibitors can enter online by clicking here. The full qualification details for Crufts 2014 can be found on the website at http://www.crufts.org.uk/qualification-crufts-2014.

Tickets to the show cost £16.50 for adults in advance and £18 on the door. Weekend tickets cost £17.60 in advance and £19 on the door. Best in Show tickets start from £17.50. Concessions are also available. All tickets are subject to a booking fee. Book by calling the Crufts Ticket Hotline at The Ticket Factory on 0844 338 0338, or online at http://www.theticketfactory.com.

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CRUFTS 2014
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Last Chance to Complete Online Entries For Crufts 2014

The Kennel Club would like to remind exhibitors of dogs qualified for Crufts 2014 that the deadline for online entries is midnight on Monday, 20thJanuary 2014.

The final entry date for Crufts has been extended to enable dogs which qualify at Boston and Manchester Dog Show Society Championship Shows in 2013 and 2014 to be entered.

Crufts takes place from 6th – 9th March 2014 at the NEC, Birmingham. The breed classes are scheduled to take place on the following days:

Thursday, 6th March 2014 — Working and Pastoral

Friday, 7th March 2014 — Terrier and Hound

Saturday, 8th March 2014 — Toy and Utility

Sunday, 9th March 2014 — Gundog

Gerald King, Chairman of Crufts said: “We thank all of the exhibitors who have so far entered Crufts 2014, the world’s most prestigious dog show, and would like to remind all exhibitors that the final closing date is 20th January 2014, so there is still time to enter. We moved the qualification date for Crufts back so that exhibitors who qualify at Manchester and Boston can bring their dogs to Crufts in 2014, rather than having to wait almost 14 months for the opportunity.”

Postal entries have now closed but exhibitors can enter online by clicking here. The full qualification details for Crufts 2014 can be found on the website at http://www.crufts.org.uk/qualification-crufts-2014.

Tickets to the show cost £16.50 for adults in advance and £18 on the door. Weekend tickets cost £17.60 in advance and £19 on the door. Best in Show tickets start from £17.50. Concessions are also available. All tickets are subject to a booking fee. Book by calling the Crufts Ticket Hotline at The Ticket Factory on 0844 338 0338, or online at http://www.theticketfactory.com.

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FCI World Dog Show Helsink 2014

FCI World Dog Show Helsinki

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Estonian Winner 2014

INT show Estonian Winner 2014 (qualifing for Crufts 2015)

http://www.kennelliit.ee/est/yritused/naitused/est_w_14_eng.pdf

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About Ambition and Joy to Show


Exitement is rising when coming nearer to the place of show. Here it will be evident if all the efforts in breeding will be recognized by this judge.It is the happy anticipation to this challenge with the competitors for the victory of this day. This is the irresistible stimulus to enter the own dogs to well frequented shows.
It is also the joy to meet competitors again with whom we will exchange ideas and experience about latest news of breeding and showing.
Already when we prepared our dogs for the show our joy was rising.
If possible we are watching with interest the unknown judge, while he is judging other breeds.What is most important for him? Each judge emphasizes what he likes best. I like it, if he observes the movement
especially often comparing the outstanding dogs for the qualification.
Unfortunately I am breeding a breed without too many special judges with a comprehensive experience in judging “my” breed at home and abroad. Therefore I look for experienced allrounders. Anyhow in both cases I try to enter my dogs to judges, who have judged my breed on several occasions.In both cases it only makes sense to enter the dogs to a judge with a comprehensive knowledge of the breed.
An interesting exchange of breeding discussions can only arise, if the relationship to competitors is a trustful one.
The interchange with others can be the alpha and omega of an improving knowledge of breeding details, f.ex. in health details.
Even if a breeder does not show by himself a dog bred by him, he will anyhow be very proud, if the dog will leave the ring as the winner of his class. It is the reputation for a good breeder, if ambitious newcomers can trust, that they will get a promising puppy.
Last but not least: also to lose in the ring belongs to good manners.
Actually it is taken for granted to receive the certificate as a Reserve Winner with a thank to the judge or the ring stewards. It is also a good custom to accept the congratulation of others in the ring.
Entering your dog means to buy the opinion of this judge on this special day within this class – not more and not less.
I wish all visitors and competitors of the coming 3 show days in Helsinki much pleasure!
@dodo

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Video Westminster Show 2013

Video Westminster 2013

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Winner of Westminster Show 2013

Winner of Westminster Show 2013

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Primary Lens Luxation/ Animal Health Trust


AHTlogoPrimary Lens Luxation (PLL) is a well-recognised, painful and blinding inherited eye condition that affects many breeds of dog, particularly terrier and terrier-type breeds including (but not restricted to) Miniature bull terriers, Tibetan terriers, Jack and Parson Russell terriers, Lancashire Heelers and Chinese Crested dogs, also the Australian Cattle Dog, Jagd Terrier, Patterdale Terrier, Rat Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, Tenterfield Terrier, Toy Fox Terrier, Volpino Italiano, Welsh Terrier, Wire-haired Fox Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier.

In affected dogs the zonular fibres which support the lens breakdown or disintegrate, causing the lens to fall into the wrong position within the eye. If the lens falls into the anterior chamber of the eye glaucoma and loss of vision can quickly result.

Scientists at the AHT have identified a mutation that is associated with the development of PLL in several breeds of dog. The DNA test we are now offering examines the DNA from each dog being tested for the presence or absence of this precise mutation. It is thus a ‘mutation-based test’ and not a ‘linkage-based test’

Breeders will be sent results identifying their dog as belonging to one of three categories:
CLEAR: these dogs have two normal copies of DNA. Our research has demonstrated clear dogs will not develop PLL as a result of the mutation we are testing for, although we cannot exclude the possibility they might develop PLL due to other causes, such as trauma or the effects of other, unidentified mutations.

CARRIER: these dogs have one copy of the mutation and one normal copy of DNA. Our research has demonstrated that carriers have a very low risk of developing PLL. The majority of carriers do not develop PLL during their lives but a small percentage do. We currently estimate that between 2% – 20% of carriers will develop the condition, although we believe the true percentage is nearer to 2% than 20%. We do not currently know why some carriers develop the condition whereas the majority do not, and we advise that all carriers have their eyes examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist every 6- 12 months, from the age of 2, throughout their entire lives.

GENETICALLY AFFECTED: these dogs have two copies of the mutation and will almost certainly develop PLL during their lifetime. We advise that all genetically affected dogs have their eyes examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist every 6 months, from the age of 18 months, so the clinical signs of PLL are detected as early as possible.

Breeding Advice
Our research has also demonstrated that the frequency of the PLL mutation is extremely high in the PLL-affected breeds that we have studied in depth. This means that allowing only CLEAR dogs to breed could have a devastating effect on breed diversity and substantially increase the likelihood of new inherited diseases emerging. Therefore, we strongly advise breeders to consider all their dogs for breeding, regardless of their PLL genotype. GENETICALLY AFFECTED and CARRIER dogs can be bred with, but should only be bred to DNA tested, CLEAR dogs. All puppies from any litter that has at least one CARRIER parent should be DNA tested, so that the CARRIERS can be identified and followed clinically throughout their lives. This practise should be followed for at least one or two generations, to allow the PLL mutation to be slowly eliminated from the population without severely reducing the genetic diversity of breeds at risk.

Frequently Asked Questions. If you have any questions about the PLL test please see if you can find an answer in our list of FAQ’s on our website PLL Genetics

Samples submitted should be cheek swabs ( a non-invasive sampling method). Sampling kits are obtainable from the Animal Health Trust webshop AHT DNA Testing. Further information can be obtained by emailing e-mail

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