The Old but always New Topic HD with Comparison Table

Those categories are normal (Excellent, Good, Fair), Borderline, and dysplastic (Mild, Moderate, Severe).

Excellent

Excellent (Figure 1):
this classification is assigned for superior conformation in comparison to other animals of the same age and breed. There is a deep seated ball (femoral head) which fits tightly into a well-formed socket (acetabulum) with minimal joint space. There is almost complete coverage of the socket over the ball.

Good

Good (Figure 2):
slightly less than superior but a well-formed congruent hip-joint is visualized. The ball fits well into the socket and good coverage is present.

Fair

Fair (Figure 3):

Assigned where minor irregularities in the hip-joint exist. The hip-joint is wider than a good hip phenotype. This is due to the ball slightly slipping out of the socket causing a minor degree of joint incongruency. There may also be slight inward deviation of the weight-bearing surface of the socket (dorsal acetabular rim) causing the socket to appear slightly shallow (Figure 4). This can be a normal finding in some breeds however, such as the Chinese Shar Pei, Chow Chow, and Poodle.

Borderline

Borderline:

there is no clear-cut consensus between the radiologists to place the hip into a given category of normal or dysplastic. There is usually more incongruency present than what occurs in the minor amount found in a fair but there are no arthritic changes present that definitively diagnose the hip-joint being dysplastic. There also may be a bony projection present on any of the areas of the hip anatomy illustrated above that can not accurately be assessed as being an abnormal arthritic change or as a normal anatomic variant for that individual dog. To increase the accuracy of a correct diagnosis, it is recommended to repeat the radiographs at a later date (usually 6 months). This allows the radiologist to compare the initial film with the most recent film over a given time period and access for progressive arthritic changes that would be expected if the dog was truly dysplastic. Most dogs with this grade (over 50%) show no change in hip conformation over time and receive a normal hip rating; usually a fair hip phenotype.

Mild

Mild Canine Hip Dysplasia (Figure 5):
there is significant subluxation present where the ball is partially out of the socket causing an incongruent increased joint space. The socket is usually shallow only partially covering the ball. There are usually no arthritic changes present with this classification and if the dog is young (24 to 30 months of age), there is an option to resubmit an radiograph when the dog is older so it can be reevaluated a second time. Most dogs will remain dysplastic showing progression of the disease with early arthritic changes. Since HD is a chronic, progressive disease, the older the dog, the more accurate the diagnosis of HD (or lack of HD).

Moderate

Moderate Canine Hip Dysplasia:there is significant subluxation present where the ball is barely seated into a shallow socket causing joint incongruency. There are secondary arthritic bone changes usually along the femoral neck and head (termed remodeling), acetabular rim changes (termed osteophytes or bone spurs) and various degrees of trabecular bone pattern changes called sclerosis. Once arthritis is reported, there is only continued progression of arthritis over time.
Severe

Severe HD (Figure 6): assigned where radiographic evidence of marked dysplasia exists. There is significant subluxation present where the ball is partly or completely out of a shallow socket. Like moderate HD, there are also large amounts of secondary arthritic bone changes along the femoral neck and head, acetabular rim changes and large amounts of abnormal bone pattern changes.

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OFA FCI(European) BVA (UK Australia) SV Germany
Excellent A-1 0-4 (no > 3/hip) Normal
Good A-2 5-10 (no > 6/hip) Normal
Fair B-1 11-18 Normal
Borderline B-2 19-25 Fast Normal
Mild C 26-35 noch akzeptiert
Moderate D 36-50 Mittlere
Severe E 51-106 Schwere
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4 Responses to The Old but always New Topic HD with Comparison Table

  1. Uruguay says:

    I’m glad that I’ve found this newacdgazette.com web site. I don’t have much to add to the conversation, but I’m right here with you. Your post said exactly what I have been thinking. Good to see you posting again.

  2. carol says:

    great comparison table but where does the USA pen score come on this range?

    • acdisla says:

      Hi Carol, in USA the OFA gives the index for the different results and their comparison to other results, f.ex. in Europe (FCI) a.s.o.

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